Tissue Cells Feel and Respond to the Stiffness of Their Substrate

@article{Discher2005TissueCF,
  title={Tissue Cells Feel and Respond to the Stiffness of Their Substrate},
  author={D. Discher and P. Janmey and Yu-Li Wang},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={310},
  pages={1139 - 1143}
}
Normal tissue cells are generally not viable when suspended in a fluid and are therefore said to be anchorage dependent. Such cells must adhere to a solid, but a solid can be as rigid as glass or softer than a baby's skin. The behavior of some cells on soft materials is characteristic of important phenotypes; for example, cell growth on soft agar gels is used to identify cancer cells. However, an understanding of how tissue cells—including fibroblasts, myocytes, neurons, and other cell types… Expand
The hard life of soft cells.
How can cells sense the elasticity of a substrate? An analysis using a cell tensegrity model.
How deeply cells feel: methods for thin gels.
The role of material structure and mechanical properties in cell-matrix interactions.
Physically based principles of cell adhesion mechanosensitivity in tissues.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 151 REFERENCES
Effects of substrate stiffness on cell morphology, cytoskeletal structure, and adhesion.
Cell movement is guided by the rigidity of the substrate.
Cell organization in soft media due to active mechanosensing
  • I. Bischofs, U. Schwarz
  • Materials Science, Physics
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2003
Cell type-specific response to growth on soft materials.
Nonlinear elasticity in biological gels
Responses of fibroblasts to anchorage of dorsal extracellular matrix receptors
Adhesion-contractile balance in myocyte differentiation
Cell locomotion and focal adhesions are regulated by substrate flexibility.
  • R. Pelham, Y. Wang
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1997
...
1
2
3
4
5
...