Timing the ancestor of the HIV-1 pandemic strains.

@article{Korber2000TimingTA,
  title={Timing the ancestor of the HIV-1 pandemic strains.},
  author={Bette T. Korber and Mark T. Muldoon and James Theiler and F. Gao and Radhika Gupta and Alan S. Lapedes and B. H. Hahn and Steven Wolinsky and Tanmoy Bhattacharya},
  journal={Science},
  year={2000},
  volume={288 5472},
  pages={
          1789-96
        }
}
HIV-1 sequences were analyzed to estimate the timing of the ancestral sequence of the main group of HIV-1, the strains responsible for the AIDS pandemic. Using parallel supercomputers and assuming a constant rate of evolution, we applied maximum-likelihood phylogenetic methods to unprecedented amounts of data for this calculation. We validated our approach by correctly estimating the timing of two historically documented points. Using a comprehensive full-length envelope sequence alignment, we… 
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TLDR
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Important differences in the evolutionary rates of the different subtypes of HIV-1 are found, indicating that these differences are caused by both different selective pressures and the replication dynamics of the strains.
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