Timing of archaic hominin occupation of Denisova Cave in southern Siberia

@article{Jacobs2019TimingOA,
  title={Timing of archaic hominin occupation of Denisova Cave in southern Siberia},
  author={Zenobia Jacobs and Bo Li and Michael V. Shunkov and Maxim B. Kozlikin and Nataliya S. Bolikhovskaya and A. K. Agadjanian and Vladimir A Uliyanov and Sergei K. Vasiliev and Kieran O'Gorman and Anatoly P. Derevianko and Richard G. Roberts},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2019},
  volume={565},
  pages={594-599}
}
The Altai region of Siberia was inhabited for parts of the Pleistocene by at least two groups of archaic hominins—Denisovans and Neanderthals. Denisova Cave, uniquely, contains stratified deposits that preserve skeletal and genetic evidence of both hominins, artefacts made from stone and other materials, and a range of animal and plant remains. The previous site chronology is based largely on radiocarbon ages for fragments of bone and charcoal that are up to 50,000 years old; older ages of… 
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