Time to move to presumed consent for organ donation

@article{Bird2010TimeTM,
  title={Time to move to presumed consent for organ donation},
  author={Sheila M Bird and John Harris},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2010},
  volume={340}
}
Given the UK’s modest 60% consent rate for donation of organs from brain stem dead donors, Sheila Bird and John Harris argue that allowing donation unless the donor has explicitly opted out would substantially increase the number of organs available 

Topics from this paper

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Presumed consent to organ donation and the family overrule
  • D. Shaw
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  • Journal of the Intensive Care Society
  • 2017
TLDR
Evidence suggests that, while the move to presumed consent often increases overall support for donation within a society, family overrules still prevent donation in many cases. Expand
How to Increase Organ Donation: Does Opting Out Have a Role?
TLDR
The Spanish model—so successful in Spain and many other countries—is not based on a requirement for opting out, and, in the UK, deceased organ donation has increased by 25% in 3 years through implementation of a series of recommendations that have transformed the infrastructure of donation. Expand
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