Time to move beyond a brainless exercise physiology: the evidence for complex regulation of human exercise performance.

@article{Noakes2011TimeTM,
  title={Time to move beyond a brainless exercise physiology: the evidence for complex regulation of human exercise performance.},
  author={Timothy David Noakes},
  journal={Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme},
  year={2011},
  volume={36 1},
  pages={
          23-35
        }
}
  • T. Noakes
  • Published 27 January 2011
  • Education
  • Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme
In 1923, Nobel Laureate A.V. Hill proposed that maximal exercise performance is limited by the development of anaerobiosis in the exercising skeletal muscles. Variants of this theory have dominated teaching in the exercise sciences ever since, but 90 years later there is little biological evidence to support Hill's belief, and much that disproves it. The cardinal weakness of the Hill model is that it allows no role for the brain in the regulation of exercise performance. As a result, it is… 

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