Time spent in the united states and breast cancer screening behaviors among ethnically diverse immigrant women: Evidence for acculturation?

@article{Brown2006TimeSI,
  title={Time spent in the united states and breast cancer screening behaviors among ethnically diverse immigrant women: Evidence for acculturation?},
  author={William Michael Brown and Nathan S. Consedine and Carol Magai},
  journal={Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health},
  year={2006},
  volume={8},
  pages={347-358}
}
The current study was designed to investigate the relations between time spent in the United States and breast cancer screening in a large sample (N=915) of ethnically diverse immigrant women living in New York City. Previous research among Hispanic women has suggested that acculturation positively influences health beliefs and preventive health behaviors. However, research has not yet extended to other growing immigrant groups, including women from Haiti and the English-speaking Caribbean, and… CONTINUE READING

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