Time-resolved resting-state brain networks

@article{Zalesky2014TimeresolvedRB,
  title={Time-resolved resting-state brain networks},
  author={Andrew Zalesky and Alex Fornito and Luca Cocchi and Leonardo L. Gollo and Michael Breakspear},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2014},
  volume={111},
  pages={10341 - 10346}
}
Significance Large-scale organizational properties of brain networks mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging have been studied in a time-averaged sense. This is an oversimplification. We demonstrate that brain activity between multiple pairs of spatially distributed regions spontaneously fluctuates in and out of correlation over time in a globally coordinated manner, giving rise to sporadic intervals during which information can be efficiently exchanged between neuronal populations… 

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