Time of origin of neurons in the murine enteric nervous system: Sequence in relation to phenotype

@article{Pham1991TimeOO,
  title={Time of origin of neurons in the murine enteric nervous system: Sequence in relation to phenotype},
  author={T. Pham and M. Gershon and T. P. Rothman},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Neurology},
  year={1991},
  volume={314}
}
The hypothesis was tested that developing enteric neurons withdraw from the cell cycle in a sequence related to their phenotype. The birthdays of immunocytochemically identified myenteric and submucosal neurons were determined in the murine duodenum and jejunum. [3H]thymidine ([3H]TdR) was injected into timed pregnant mice or pups at 4–8 hour intervals over a 24 hour period. Pups were killed on postnatal day 30 (P30). [3H]TdR incorporation was detected by radioautography in enteric neurons… Expand
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