Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms

Abstract

Time-of-day effects in human psychological functioning have been known of since the 1800s. However, outside of research specifically focused on the quantification of circadian rhythms, their study has largely been neglected. Moves toward online data collection now mean that psychological investigations take place around the clock, which affords researchers… (More)
DOI: 10.7717/peerj.1947

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Schofield2016TimeofdayEI, title={Time-of-day effects in implicit racial in-group preferences are likely selection effects, not circadian rhythms}, author={Timothy P Schofield}, booktitle={PeerJ}, year={2016} }