Time constraints and multiple choice criteria in the sampling behaviour and mate choice of the fiddler crab, Uca annulipes

@article{Backwell1996TimeCA,
  title={Time constraints and multiple choice criteria in the sampling behaviour and mate choice of the fiddler crab, Uca annulipes},
  author={P. Backwell and N. Passmore},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={38},
  pages={407-416}
}
Abstract Active female sampling occurs in the fiddler crab Uca annulipes. Females sample the burrows of several males before remaining to mate in the burrow of the chosen partner. Females time larval release to coincide with the following nocturnal spring tide and must therefore leave sufficient time for embryonic development after mating. Here we show how this temporal constraint on search time affects female choosiness. We found that, at the start of the sampling period (when time constraints… Expand

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