Time Course of Recovery After Epley Maneuvers for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

@article{Smouha1997TimeCO,
  title={Time Course of Recovery After Epley Maneuvers for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo},
  author={Eric Smouha},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={1997},
  volume={107}
}
  • E. Smouha
  • Published 1 February 1997
  • Medicine
  • The Laryngoscope
The canalith repositioning maneuver (CRP) of Epley is an effective treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). While CRP has been advocated by some as a “single treatment” for BPPV, others have had less uniform results for this self‐limited disorder. In order to better define the role of CRP in relieving vertigo, we studied the time course of recovery in 27 consecutive cases of BPPV. We recorded nystagmus after each head maneuver and at each evaluation until complete resolution… 
SUCCESS OF THE MODIFIED EPLEY MANEUVER IN BENINGN PAROXYSMAL POSITIONAL VERTIGO
TLDR
The Modified Epley Maneuver is a safe and cost effective treatment modality for BPPV and it can be easily performed as an office based procedure.
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TLDR
It was found that liberatory nystagmus had a high prognostic value and that it was not necessary for patients to avoid certain positions or movements after treatment.
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The liberatory maneuver of Semont is an effective physical treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. It works because it causes otoconia to move out the posterior canal. The effectiveness
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TLDR
The modified Epley maneuver is an excellent treatment for BPPV and can be repeated for up to a maximum of three times, at which point patients were considered to have failed treatment.
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TLDR
The canalith repositioning procedure as it was initially described by Epley is discussed, as well as to discuss the modifications of the procedure that have been proposed, and to expand on the overall management of the patient with posterior canal BPPV.
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TLDR
There was no statistically significant difference between performing a single EM versus multiple EMs for treatment of PC-BPPV in the emergency department, which is logically safer in a pandemic context.
The canalith repositioning maneuver in patients with benign positional vertigo
TLDR
Unless there is no response to CRM or there is suspicion of an incorrect diagnosis, it is not necessary to perform diagnostic studies routinely for differentiating other neuro-otologic disorders prior to using CRM in BPPV patients diagnosed by the Dix-Hallpike test.
The Effect of Early Canalith Repositioning on Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo on Recurrence
TLDR
Performing repositioning treatments as soon as possible after symptom onset may be an important factor in the prevention of BPVV recurrence.
Epley's maneuver in the same session in benign positional paroxysmal vertigo.
TLDR
Repeated Epley's maneuvers in less sessions rendered more positional nystagmus-free patients when compared to those submitted to more sessions of single maneuvers, and a significant association between number of sessions and group was observed.
Effectiveness of the Particle Repositioning Maneuver in Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo with and without Additional Vestibular Pathology
  • L. Pollak, R. Davies, L. Luxon
  • Medicine
    Otology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
  • 2002
TLDR
This study demonstrates that patients with BPPV+ do not have a worse prognosis with respect to resolution of positional nystagmus, on performing the particle repositioning procedure, compared with patients with uncomplicated B PPV.
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References

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TLDR
The results of the Canalith Repositioning Procedure support an alternative theory that the densities that impart gravity-sensitivity to a semicircular canal in BPPV are free in the canal, rather than attached to the cupula.
Particle Repositioning Maneuver for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo
TLDR
The direction of the nystagmus during the second stage of the maneuver appears important in predicting the efficacy, with reversal of nyStagmus denoting a poor response, and these findings provide additional insight into the pathophysiology of this disorder.
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It is concluded that APPN has a less favorable prognosis than typical BPPV, and that a CNS etiology should be suspected in prolonged cases.
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TLDR
Sixty-six patients with the symptoms of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo were treated by challenging them with the precipitating head positions on a repeated and serial basis and one patient whose condition did not respond was found to have a perilymphatic fistula that mimicked BPPV.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Canonolithiasis rather than cupulolithiasis provides a better definition of the underlying mechanism in BPPV, which fits clinical experience.
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The canalith repositioning procedure has recently gained controversial recognition as a treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Some authors contend that the canalith repositioning
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    Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery
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TLDR
In a series of 67 patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo with a minimum of four weeks of follow-up, only two have not responded to the canalith repositioning maneuver, yielding a 97% rate of symptom control.
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TLDR
Thirty-six subjects with confirmed, unilateral benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo of at least 2 months' duration were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups and found that those who received the canalith repositioning procedure had significantly more negative responses than did those in the placebo group.
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