Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury

@article{Sturnick2014TibialAC,
  title={Tibial articular cartilage and meniscus geometries combine to influence female risk of anterior cruciate ligament injury},
  author={Daniel R. Sturnick and Robert A. Van Gorder and Pamela M Vacek and Michael J Desarno and Mack G. Gardner‐Morse and Timothy W. Tourville and James R. Slauterbeck and Robert James Johnson and Sandra J. Shultz and Bruce D. Beynnon},
  journal={Journal of Orthopaedic Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={32}
}
Tibial plateau subchondral bone geometry has been associated with the risk of sustaining a non‐contact ACL injury; however, little is known regarding the influence of the meniscus and articular cartilage interface geometry on risk. We hypothesized that geometries of the tibial plateau articular cartilage surface and meniscus were individually associated with the risk of non‐contact ACL injury. In addition, we hypothesized that the associations were independent of the underlying subchondral bone… 
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Impact of ACL Injury on Patellar Cartilage Thickness
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The findings from this study indicate that directional, regional and sex specific cartilage thickness changes occur following ACL injury, surgery, and 4 year follow-up.
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