Thyrocalcitonin-containing cells in the Di George anomaly.

@article{Burke1987ThyrocalcitonincontainingCI,
  title={Thyrocalcitonin-containing cells in the Di George anomaly.},
  author={Barbara A. Burke and Daniel F. Johnson and Enid F. Gilbert and Ricardo Drut and J Ludwig and Mark Robert Wick},
  journal={Human pathology},
  year={1987},
  volume={18 4},
  pages={
          355-60
        }
}
The Di George syndrome is an anomaly characterized by the complete or partial absence of derivatives of the third and fourth pharyngeal pouches often associated with defective development of the third, fourth, and sixth aortic arches leading to absence or hypoplasia of the thymus and parathyroid glands and to cardiovascular anomalies. The fifth pharyngeal pouch, often considered a part of the fourth pouch, gives rise to the ultimobranchial body (UB), which becomes incorporated into the thyroid… Expand
Thyroid C cells in the DiGeorge anomaly: a quantitative study.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that C cells are present in the thyroid of patients with DGA more frequently than expected, although in deficient numbers when compared quantitatively to age-matched controls showing a normal infantile pattern of thyroid C cell distribution. Expand
Decrease in thyrocalcitonin-containing cells and analysis of other congenital anomalies in 11 patients with DiGeorge anomaly.
TLDR
Results indicate a decrease in cells derived from the neural crest in patients with DiGeorge anomaly, and support the hypothesis of a neural crest disturbance as the pathogenetic factor responsible for this anomaly. Expand
Third and fourth pouch/arch syndrome (Di George anomaly) in one dizygotic twin
TLDR
Findings in humans and models in mice and chick embryos suggest that DGA depends on the failure of neuralcrest mesenchymal derivatives to migrate and interact properly with pharyngeal epithelium, and causes of this failure are poorly understood. Expand
The DiGeorge anomaly
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  • Medicine, Biology
  • Immunodeficiency reviews
  • 1991
TLDR
The modern research approaches now available have cleared away most of the confusion clouding the clinical and theoretical aspects of DGA and related disorders, providing the clinician with useful landmarks to assess and treat these intriguing clinical challenges. Expand
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TLDR
The decrease of neural crest-derived cells in the thyroid of patients with "isolated" TA documents more extent abnormalities than clinically suspected and supports the hypothesis of Neural crest disturbance as the pathogenetic factor responsible for this heart malformation. Expand
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TLDR
Morphologic and genetic abnormalities support the idea that C-cells in the familial form of C-cell hyperplasia are neoplastic and can be recognized with conventional stains, therefore, the number ofC-cells is irrelevant for the diagnosis. Expand
Thyroid Abnormalities as a Feature of DiGeorge Syndrome: A Patient Report and Review of the Literature
TLDR
This case suggests that thyroid gland dysgenesis may be more common than previously thought and children with the DiGeorge syndrome may be at higher risk for hypothyroidism, and patients who are considered to have this anomaly should have early newborn thyroid screening. Expand
Compact buds with biphasic differentiation and calcitonin-expressing neuroendocrine cells—previously unrecognized structures of thyroglossal duct unveiled by immunohistochemistry
TLDR
Thyroglossal duct cysts are searched for for neuroendocrine cells in TGD cysts and precursor compact buds with dual immunophenotype are discovered and a concept of their morphogenesis is proposed. Expand
Case report DiGeorge syndrome associated with left lung aplasia
TLDR
This work describes a female neonate in whom the pre- viously unreported feature of pulmonary aplasia was present in association with the classical findings of DiGeorge syndrome, and reports a patient with clinical and cytogenetic findings consistent with DiGeorge- velocardiofacial syndrome and a plasia of the left lung. Expand
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Similar to 22q11DS, adults with TOF meeting screening criteria for a possible genetic syndrome are enriched for more severe cardiac disease and late-onset extracardiac features. Expand
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References

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Cardiovascular malformations in DiGeorge syndrome (congenital absence of hypoplasia of the thymus).
TLDR
From observations and a survey of the previously published patients it appears that 90% of the necropsy-proven cases of DiGeorge syndrome have cardiovascular malformations and that 95 per cent of these mal Formations can be classified as aortic arch anomalies, truncus ateriosus, or tetralogy of Fallot. Expand
DiGeorge's or the III-IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome: pathology and a theory of pathogenesis.
TLDR
Both embryologic and clinical data support the possibility of a deficiency of ultimobranchial tissue and the range of minor and inconstant anomalies seen in patients with this syndrome is presented. Expand
Cytochemical Evidence for an Ultimobranchial Origin of Rodent Thyroid C Cells
THE cells referred to in this communication were called parafollicular cells by Nonidez1 in dog thyroid. The name was afterwards transferred to cells staining in a similar manner in other species,Expand
The spectrum of the DiGeorge syndrome.
TLDR
Most of the patients surviving the first month of life developed purulent rhinitis, maculopapular rashes, failure to thrive, and developmental delay, while the 24 autopsied cases constitute 0.7% of the 3,469 sequential postmortem studies done in the period 1950--1975 at The Children's Orthopedic Hospital and Medical Center. Expand
Congenital Cardiovascular Disease and Anomalies of the Third and Fourth Pharyngeal Pouch
TLDR
Patients with the third and fourth pharyngeal pouch syndrome, thymic and parathyroid aplasia or hypoplasia, have a very high incidence of aortic arch anomalies and congenital heart disease, and patients with profound neonatal hypocalcemia should be screened for evidence of normalThymic function and congenitals heart disease. Expand
891 ETIOLOGY OF FIRST DAY HYPOCALCEMIA (FDH): ROLE OF PTH AND CALCITONIN?
TLDR
Hypersecretion of CT may be an important cause of hypocalcemia during early postnatal life and concomitant hypoparathyroidism may further augment the effect of hypercalcitoninemia. Expand
Calcitonin: its nature and role in man.
TLDR
Consideration will be given to the distribution in nature, structure, and physicochemical and biological properties of the hormone; its measurement, regulation of secretion, and laboratory synthesis; and, finally, its role in health and disease in humans. Expand
The teratogenic effects of a bis(dichloroacetyl)diamine on hamster embryos. Aortic arch anomalies and the pathogenesis of the DiGeorge syndrome.
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American journal of pathology
  • 1985
TLDR
A study of the teratogenic effects of Fertilysin, a bis(dichloroacetyl)diamine, on hamster embryos was undertaken for a comparison with the DiGeorge syndrome, a rare birth defect characterized by thymic and parathyroid gland agenesis, abnormal facies, and aortic arch malformations. Expand
Neural crest and normal development: A new perspective
TLDR
It is proposed that many of these syndromes are due to inappropriate development of neural crest, and the implications include the predictions that asplenia and certain other anomalies have the same etiology, and that it is possible to observe the effects of teratogenic agents upon a cellular population at the time when it is being altered, rather than waiting until definitive organs may be examined. Expand
Congenital absence of the pulmonary valve associated with congenital aplasia of the thymus (DiGeorge's syndrome).
TLDR
Some of the expected roentgen signs, such as a narrow mediastinal silhouette and marked enlargement of the central pulmonary arteries, may be masked by cardiomediastinal shift due to bronchial compression. Expand
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