Thrombophilia and the risk for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy, delivery, and puerperium.

Abstract

The main inherited thrombophilias (antithrombin deficiency, protein C and S deficiency, FVL, the prothrombin gene variant, and MTHFR C677T homozygotes) have a combined prevalence in Western European populations of 15% to 20%. One or more of these inherited thrombophilias is usually found in approximately 50% of women who have a personal history of VTE. Obstetricians must therefore be aware of the interaction between thrombophilias and the procoagulant state of pregnancy and should have an understanding of additional risk factors that may act synergistically with thrombophilias to induce VTE. Such knowledge combined with the appropriate use of thromboprophylaxis and treatment in women who have objectively confirmed VTE continue to improve maternal and perinatal outcomes.

0204060201520162017
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Cite this paper

@article{Nelson2006ThrombophiliaAT, title={Thrombophilia and the risk for venous thromboembolism during pregnancy, delivery, and puerperium.}, author={Scott M . Nelson and Ian Andrew Greer}, journal={Obstetrics and gynecology clinics of North America}, year={2006}, volume={33 3}, pages={413-27} }