Three-Dimensional CT Examination of the Mastication System in the Giant Anteater

@inproceedings{Endo2007ThreeDimensionalCE,
  title={Three-Dimensional CT Examination of the Mastication System in the Giant Anteater},
  author={Hideki Endo and Nobuharu Niizawa and Teruyuki Komiya and Shin-ichiro Kawada and Junpei Kimura and Takuya Itou and Hiroshi Koie and Takeo Sakai},
  booktitle={Zoological science},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract The gross anatomy of the mastication system of the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) was examined by means of three-dimensional image analysis. The anteater rotates the mandibles medially and laterally to control its tongue when it is elongated and to house it when it is relaxed. Three-dimensional CT image analysis demonstrated that the shape and size of the oral cavity changes drastically when the mandibles are rotated. The oral cavity expands bilaterally when the dorsal part… 
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