Threatened fishes of the world: Neoceratodus forsteri (Kreft, 1870) (Neoceratodontidae)

@article{Kemp2004ThreatenedFO,
  title={Threatened fishes of the world: Neoceratodus forsteri (Kreft, 1870) (Neoceratodontidae)},
  author={Anne Kemp},
  journal={Environmental Biology of Fishes},
  year={2004},
  volume={43},
  pages={310}
}
  • A. Kemp
  • Published 1 July 1995
  • Environmental Science
  • Environmental Biology of Fishes
Common names: Ceratodus (adopted as common usage), Queensland or Australian lungfish (E), dipneuste (F), Lungenfisch (G), djelleh, theebine (Aboriginal) . Conservation status: Appendix 2 of CITES, threatened by trade . Identification: The only known living neoceratodont lungfish . Median fins continuous, tail diphycercal, paired fins lobed and paddle shaped . Scales large and covered in epithelium . A large fish (maximum length 170cm), olive or brown in colour dorsally with a pale to bright… 
Comparison of embryological development in the threatened Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri from two sites in a Queensland river system
TLDR
Comparison of embryological development between eggs and embryos found in unaltered reaches of the Brisbane River to eggs and embryo from a spawning event in Lake Wivenhoe, suggests that lungfish may face more problems than lack of shelter for the young.
Australian Lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri): A Missing Link in the Evolution of Complementary Side Biases for Predator Avoidance and Prey Capture
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It is concluded that the Australian lungfish is a homologous pattern of lateralization that evolved in early aquatic vertebrates and was retained as they made the transition to land-dwelling tetrapods.
Abnormal development in embryos and hatchlings of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, from two reservoirs in south-east Queensland
  • A. Kemp
  • Environmental Science
    Australian Journal of Zoology
  • 2013
TLDR
Prospective recruitment of young lungfish in reservoir populations faces another threat, that of anomalous development of the embryos, hatchlings and juveniles, severe enough to kill many embryos within days of oviposition, and destroy the young fish before they are more than a few months old.
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TLDR
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New insights into ancient environments using dental characters in Australian Cenozoic lungfish
  • A. Kemp
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 2005
TLDR
Information from studies of fossil lungfish confirms that conservation of the few living species of lungfish depends on the maintenance of clean environments that provide adequate supplies of food and suitable sites for spawning and for the growth of young fish.
Effects of Water Level Fluctuations on Spawning Habitat of an Endangered Species, the Australian Lungfish (Neoceratodus Forsteri)
TLDR
Water storages within the distribution of Australian lungfish fluctuate by ±1 m more frequently in comparison to associated riverine environments, which challenge the establishment of dense macrophyte beds required for lungfish spawning.
Investigation and management of an outbreak of multispecies mycobacteriosis in Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus fosteri) including the use of triple antibiotic treatment.
TLDR
ZSL London Zoo managed an outbreak of mycobacteriosis in a valuable group of imported F1 captive-bred Australian lungfish by depopulation, isolation, extensive testing and daily oral antibiotic treatment.
Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, threatened by a new dam
  • A. Arthington
  • Environmental Science
    Environmental Biology of Fishes
  • 2008
TLDR
Evidence is assembles that impoundment of the Mary River and regulation of river flows are likely to decrease and fragment important lungfish populations, disrupt the breeding cycle, reduce juvenile recruitment, and isolate and decrease habitat availability/quality to such an extent that the species is likely to decline.

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
The biology of the australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (krefft 1870)
TLDR
It is concluded that, despite locally abundant populations of lungfish in rivers of southeast Queensland, the species is still at risk of extinction from a number of natural or artificial causes.
Some further observations on the rearing of Ceratodus