Threat of shock increases excitability and connectivity of the intraparietal sulcus

@inproceedings{Balderston2017ThreatOS,
  title={Threat of shock increases excitability and connectivity of the intraparietal sulcus},
  author={Nicholas L. Balderston and Elizabeth A Hale and Abigail Hsiung and Salvatore Torrisi and Tom Holroyd and Frederick W. Carver and Richard Coppola and Monique Ernst and Christian Grillon},
  booktitle={eLife},
  year={2017}
}
Anxiety disorders affect approximately 1 in 5 (18%) Americans within a given 1 year period, placing a substantial burden on the national health care system. Therefore, there is a critical need to understand the neural mechanisms mediating anxiety symptoms. We used unbiased, multimodal, data-driven, whole-brain measures of neural activity (magnetoencephalography) and connectivity (fMRI) to identify the regions of the brain that contribute most prominently to sustained anxiety. We report that a… CONTINUE READING