Thickness and structure of the martian crust from InSight seismic data

@article{KnapmeyerEndrun2021ThicknessAS,
  title={Thickness and structure of the martian crust from InSight seismic data},
  author={Brigitte Knapmeyer‐Endrun and Mark Paul Panning and Felix Bissig and Rakshit Joshi and Amir Khan and Doyeon Kim and Vedran Leki{\'c} and Beno{\^i}t Tauzin and Saikiran Tharimena and Matthieu Plasman and Nicolas Compaire and Raphael F. Garcia and Ludovic Margerin and Martin Schimmel and {\'E}l{\'e}onore Stutzmann and Nicholas Charles Schmerr and Ebru Bozdağ and Ana‐Catalina Plesa and Mark A. Wieczorek and Adrien Pierre Michel Broquet and Daniele Antonangeli and Scott M. McLennan and Henri Samuel and Chlo{\'e} Michaut and Lu Pan and Suzanne E. Smrekar and Catherine L. Johnson and Nienke Brinkman and Anna Magdalena Mittelholz and Attilio Rivoldini and Paul M. Davis and Philippe Henri Lognonn{\'e} and Baptiste Pinot and John‐Robert Scholz and Simon C. St{\"a}hler and Martin Knapmeyer and Martin van Driel and Domenico Giardini and William Bruce Banerdt},
  journal={Science},
  year={2021},
  volume={373},
  pages={438 - 443}
}
Single seismometer structure Because of the lack of direct seismic observations, the interior structure of Mars has been a mystery. Khan et al., Knapmeyer-Endrun et al., and Stähler et al. used recently detected marsquakes from the seismometer deployed during the InSight mission to map the interior of Mars (see the Perspective by Cottaar and Koelemeijer). Mars likely has a 24- to 72-kilometer-thick crust with a very deep lithosphere close to 500 kilometers. Similar to the Earth, a low-velocity… Expand
11 Citations
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This is a PDF file of an article that has undergone enhancements after acceptance, such as the addition of a cover page and metadata, and formatting for readability, but it is not yet the definitiveExpand
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Upper mantle structure of Mars from InSight seismic data
TLDR
The seismic constraints with geodynamic models predict that, relative to the primitive mantle, the crust of Mars is more enriched in heat-producing elements by a factor of 13 to 20 and has a moderate-to-elevated surface heat flow. Expand
The seismicity of Mars
The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission landed in Elysium Planitia on Mars on 26 November 2018 and fully deployed its seismometer by theExpand
Pre-mission InSights on the Interior of Mars
The Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport (InSight) Mission will focus on Mars’ interior structure and evolution. The basic structure of crust, mantle, andExpand
Constraints on the shallow elastic and anelastic structure of Mars from InSight seismic data
Mars’s seismic activity and noise have been monitored since January 2019 by the seismometer of the InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) lander. AtExpand
Geodesy constraints on the interior structure and composition of Mars
Abstract Knowledge of the interior structure of Mars is of fundamental importance to the understanding of its past and present state as well as its future evolution. The most prominent interiorExpand
The Crust of the Moon as Seen by GRAIL
TLDR
The Moon's gravity field shows that the lunar crust is less dense and more porous than was thought, and high-resolution gravity data obtained from the dual Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) spacecraft show that the bulk density of the Moon's highlands crust is substantially lower than generally assumed. Expand
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Abstract The InSight (Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport) mission landed on the surface of Mars on November 26, 2018. One of the scientific instruments inExpand
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Magnetic fields provide a window into a planet’s interior structure and evolution, including its atmospheric and space environments. Satellites at Mars have measured crustal magnetic fieldsExpand
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EARLY CRUSTAL EVOLUTION OF MARS 1
▪ Abstract The bulk of the ∼50-km-thick Martian crust formed at ∼4.5 Gyr B.P., perhaps from a magma ocean. This crust is probably a basaltic andesite or andesite and is enriched in incompatible andExpand
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