Thiamine (Vitamin B1)

@article{FattalValevski2011ThiamineB,
  title={Thiamine (Vitamin B1)},
  author={Aviva Fattal-Valevski},
  journal={Complementary Health Practice Review},
  year={2011},
  volume={16},
  pages={12 - 20}
}
Thiamine (vitamin B 1) was the first B vitamin to have been identified. It serves as a cofactor for several enzymes involved in energy metabolism. The thiamine-dependent enzymes are important for the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters and for the production of reducing substances used in oxidant stress defenses, as well as for the synthesis of pentoses used as nucleic acid precursors. Thiamine plays a central role in cerebral metabolism. Its deficiency results in dry beriberi, a peripheral… Expand
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CONTEXT Vitamins B1 (thiamine), B3 (niacin), B6 (pyridoxine), and C (ascorbic acid) are vital for energy, carbohydrate, lipid, and amino acid metabolism and in the regulation of the cellular redoxExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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