Thermoregulation in the Wood Stork, with Special Reference to the Role of the Legs

@article{Kahl1963ThermoregulationIT,
  title={Thermoregulation in the Wood Stork, with Special Reference to the Role of the Legs},
  author={M. Philip Kahl},
  journal={Physiological Zoology},
  year={1963},
  volume={36},
  pages={141 - 151}
}
  • M. Kahl
  • Published 1 April 1963
  • Environmental Science
  • Physiological Zoology
ECOLOGICAL field studies of the American wood stork (Mycteria americana) in Florida during the last three years have suggested a number of physiological questions. At certain times, particularly at their treetop nests, wood storks are exposed to high temperatures and intense insolation. Under such conditions they have the unusual habit of frequently excreting on their legs. After watching this behavior repeatedly in the field, I formulated the hypothesis that it is part of a thermo- 

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  • Environmental Science, Biology
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During recent field studies of all 17 species of storks, I have had opportunities to observe spread-wing postures in a number of species and under different environmental conditions.

THE USE AND FUNCTION OF GREEN NEST MATERIAL BY WOOD STORKS

It is demonstrated that the greenery functions to insulate nest contents in a rather porous, twig structure and probably does not function to repel nest ectoparasites of Wood Storks.

Growth and development of temperature regulation in nestling cattle egrets.

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COMPARATIVE ETHOLOGY OF THE CICONIIDAE. THE WOOD-STORKS (GENERA MYCTERIA AND IBIS)*

The behavioural and morphological evidence now available does not justify the separation of M. americana into a monotypic genus, and it is suggested that all four wood-storks be combined in the genus Mycteria, which is similar to each other in most behaviour patterns.

ONTOGENY OF THERMOREGULATION IN

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Thermoregulatory behavior of eared seals.

Thermoregulatory behavior was studied in the Steller sea lion and in the South Australian fur seal during their respective reproductive seasons, finding that both species resorted to the water for cooling and the behavior of sea lion pups showed less of a direct correlation with temperatures than for their mothers.
...

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