Thermoregulation in a large bird, the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)

@article{Maloney2004ThermoregulationIA,
  title={Thermoregulation in a large bird, the emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae)},
  author={Shane K. Maloney and Terence J Dawson},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2004},
  volume={164},
  pages={464-472}
}
The emu is a large, flightless bird native to Australia. [] Key Result At-5°C the cost of maintaining thermal balance is 2.6 times basal metabolic rate. By sitting down and reducing heat loss from the legs the cost of homeothermy at-5°C is reduced to 1.5 times basal metabolic rate. At high ambient temperatures the emu utilises cutaneous evaporative water loss in addition to panting. At 45°C evaporation is equal to 160% of heat production. Panting accounts for 70% of total evaporation at 45°C. The cost of…
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