Thermal tolerances of sea turtle embryos: current understanding and future directions

@article{Howard2014ThermalTO,
  title={Thermal tolerances of sea turtle embryos: current understanding and future directions},
  author={Robert Howard and Ian P. Bell and David A. Pike},
  journal={Endangered Species Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={26},
  pages={75-86}
}
ABSTRACT: Developing sea turtle embryos only successfully hatch within a relatively narrow temperature range, rendering this immobile life stage vulnerable to the vagaries of climate change. To accurately predict the potential impact of climate change on sea turtle egg mortality, we need to fully understand the thermal tolerance of developing embryos. We reviewed the literature on this topic, and found that published studies interpret the primary literature and subsequent reviews very… Expand

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