There are no public-policy implications: A reply to Rushton and Jensen (2005).

@article{Sternberg2005ThereAN,
  title={There are no public-policy implications: A reply to Rushton and Jensen (2005).},
  author={Robert J. Sternberg},
  journal={Psychology, Public Policy and Law},
  year={2005},
  volume={11},
  pages={295-301}
}
  • R. Sternberg
  • Published 1 June 2005
  • Education
  • Psychology, Public Policy and Law
J. P. Rushton and A. R. Jensen (2005) purport to show public-policy implications arising from their analysis of alleged genetic bases for group mean differences in IQ. This article argues that none of these implications in fact follow from any of the data they present. The risk in work such as this is that public-policy implications may come to be ideologically driven rather than data driven, and to drive the research rather than be driven by the data. The quest to show that one socially… 

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