Therapeutic thoracentesis: the role of ultrasound and pleural manometry

@article{FellerKopman2007TherapeuticTT,
  title={Therapeutic thoracentesis: the role of ultrasound and pleural manometry},
  author={David J Feller-Kopman},
  journal={Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={13},
  pages={312–318}
}
Purpose of review Therapeutic thoracentesis is one of the most commonly performed medical procedures. The availability of handheld ultrasound machines has greatly enhanced the evaluation and management of patients with pleural effusions, with advantages including the absence of radiation, ease of use, portability and real-time/dynamic imaging. Pleural manometry refers to the measurement of pleural pressure during thoracentesis. Though described more than 122 years ago, most physicians do not… Expand
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