Therapeutic potential of venom peptides

@article{Lewis2003TherapeuticPO,
  title={Therapeutic potential of venom peptides},
  author={Richard James Lewis and Maria L. Garcia},
  journal={Nature Reviews Drug Discovery},
  year={2003},
  volume={2},
  pages={790-802}
}
Venomous animals have evolved a vast array of peptide toxins for prey capture and defence. These peptides are directed against a wide variety of pharmacological targets, making them an invaluable source of ligands for studying the properties of these targets in different experimental paradigms. A number of these peptides have been used in vivo for proof-of-concept studies, with several having undergone preclinical or clinical development for the treatment of pain, diabetes, multiple sclerosis… 
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This review focusses on the potential of cone snails that have developed arrays of small peptides as part of highly evolved venoms used for prey capture and defence, making them a valuable source of new ligands for studying the role these targets play in normal and disease physiology.
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TLDR
The current pipeline of venom-derived therapeutics is surveyed and the potential of peptide and protein drugs derived from venoms is critically examined, including an increasing industry focus on disulfide-rich venom peptides and the use of a broader array of molecular targets in order to develop venom-based therapeutics for treating a wider range of clinical conditions.
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  • Biology, Medicine
    Progress in molecular and subcellular biology
  • 2009
TLDR
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TLDR
This minireview highlights molecular details of their toxin-receptor interactions and opportunities for development of peptide therapeutics.
Animal protein toxins: origins and therapeutic applications
TLDR
The components and applications of animal toxins are described as potential drug candidates in the treatment of human diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, neuropathic pain, as well as autoimmune diseases.
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TLDR
Several conopeptides reduce pain in animals models, with one in clinical development and one marketed (ω- conotoxin MVIIA or Prialt) for the treatment of severe pain.
Venomics: a new paradigm for natural products-based drug discovery
TLDR
Technological developments in the miniaturization of bioassays and improvements in the sensitivity of mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy are discussed in the context of establishing a high-throughput pipeline for venoms-based drug discovery.
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