Theories of musculoskeletal injury causation

@article{Kumar2001TheoriesOM,
  title={Theories of musculoskeletal injury causation},
  author={S. Kumar},
  journal={Ergonomics},
  year={2001},
  volume={44},
  pages={17 - 47}
}
  • S. Kumar
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • Ergonomics
Based on the scientific evidence in published literature about precipitation of musculoskeletal injuries in the workplace, four theories have been proposed to explain these afflictions. Central to all theories is the presupposition that all occupational musculoskeletal injuries are biomechanical in nature. Disruption of mechanical order of a biological system is dependent on the individual components and their mechanical properties. These common denominators will be causally affected by the… Expand
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