The weirdest people in the world?

@article{Henrich2010TheWP,
  title={The weirdest people in the world?},
  author={J. Henrich and S. Heine and A. Norenzayan},
  journal={Behavioral and Brain Sciences},
  year={2010},
  volume={33},
  pages={61 - 83}
}
Abstract Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world's top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers – often implicitly – assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these “standard subjects” are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the… Expand
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