The vertebral remains of the late Miocene great ape Hispanopithecus laietanus from Can Llobateres 2 (Vallès-Penedès Basin, NE Iberian Peninsula).

@article{Susanna2014TheVR,
  title={The vertebral remains of the late Miocene great ape Hispanopithecus laietanus from Can Llobateres 2 (Vall{\`e}s-Pened{\`e}s Basin, NE Iberian Peninsula).},
  author={Ivette Susanna and David M. Alba and Sergio Alm{\'e}cija and Salvador Moy{\`a}-Sol{\`a}},
  journal={Journal of human evolution},
  year={2014},
  volume={73},
  pages={
          15-34
        }
}
Here we describe the vertebral fragments from the partial skeleton IPS18800 of the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus laietanus (Hominidae: Dryopithecinae) from the late Miocene (9.6 Ma) of Can Llobateres 2 (Vallès-Penedès Basin, Catalonia, Spain). The eight specimens (IPS18800.5-IPS18800.12) include a fragment of thoracic vertebral body, three partial bodies and four neural arch fragments of lumbar vertebrae. Despite the retention of primitive features (moderately long lumbar vertebral bodies… Expand
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