The vegetation requirements of Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) in non-urban edge and urbanised habitats

@article{Parsons2008TheVR,
  title={The vegetation requirements of Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) in non-urban edge and urbanised habitats},
  author={Holly Parsons and Kristine French and Richard E. Major},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2008},
  volume={108},
  pages={283 - 291}
}
Abstract Urbanisation has created an environment with a broad spectrum of habitats of differing quality for birds. Understanding habitat characteristics is necessary for effective conservation of species in urban environments. We investigated the vegetation requirements of a small, shrub-nesting, Australian bird, the Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus), and the relative quality of urban habitats in the Illawarra region of New South Wales. Vegetation was assessed in three different habitats… 

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