The value of grooming to female primates

@article{Henazi2007TheVO,
  title={The value of grooming to female primates},
  author={S. P. Henazi and L. Barrett},
  journal={Primates},
  year={2007},
  volume={40},
  pages={47-59}
}
Current socioecological models suggest that the structure of female-bonded primate groups is predicated on the need for coalitionary support in competitive interactions. Social grooming is thought to be the means by which females ensure support from other individuals, either by the direct exchange of grooming for aid or by using grooming as a means of strengthening social bonds. Since these relationships are valuable, they must be regularly serviced and must be repaired if they become damaged… Expand

Topics from this paper

Mutual grooming among adult male chimpanzees: the immediate investment hypothesis
Unidirectional grooming is a low-cost behaviour for which the groomer is repaid via kin selection or reciprocity. Return benefits can come in the form of increased probability of being groomed orExpand
What Does Mutual Grooming Tell Us About Why Chimpanzees Groom
Grooming might be a resource that is offered in exchange for some benefit (e.g. access to a feeding site or coalitionary support) or it might be a mechanism for building and servicing socialExpand
Coexistence in Female‐Bonded Primate Groups
Publisher Summary This chapter deals with the coexistence in female-bonded (FB) primate groups. The aim of the chapter is to review the data, highlighting the strengths, insights, and shortcomings ofExpand
The functional significance of grooming behaviour in higher primates: the case of free-living chimpanzees by
Grooming in primates is a social interaction used to establish and reinforce social relationships between group members. Chimpanzees have a fission–fusion social organisation where group members doExpand
Grooming and group cohesion in primates: implications for the evolution of language
It is well established that allogrooming, which evolved for a hygienic function, has acquired an important derived social function in many primates. In particular, it has been postulated thatExpand
Grooming reciprocation among female primates: a meta-analysis
TLDR
A meta-analysis of grooming reciprocation among female primates showed that female primates groom preferentially those group mates that groom them most, and this result holds true when controlling for maternal kinship. Expand
Grooming decisions under structural despotism: the impact of social rank and bystanders among wild male chimpanzees
Understanding the evolution of cooperation remains a central concern in studies of animal behaviour, with fundamental issues being how individuals avoid being cheated, or ‘short-changed’, and howExpand
Emergent Patterns of Social Affiliation in Primates, a Model
TLDR
An individual-based model with a high potential for self-organisation is used as a null model to increase the understanding of affiliative behaviour among primates, in particular macaques. Expand
Wild Vervet Monkeys Trade Tolerance and Specific Coalitionary Support for Grooming in Experimentally Induced Conflicts
TLDR
It is found that while dominants were generally more tolerant toward bonded individuals, recent grooming increased tolerance independently of relationship quality, and that vervet monkeys traded grooming for short-term tolerance, where dominants used a direct-reciprocity decision rule. Expand
Grooming and agonistic support: a meta-analysis of primate reciprocal altruism
TLDR
Findings suggest that grooming and agonistic support may have evolved as part of a system of low-cost reciprocal altruism, and highlight the potential of meta-analysis in tackling the study of behavioral phenomena characterized by low overall frequency and small effect sizes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 81 REFERENCES
The Chimpanzee's service economy: Food for grooming
Abstract Evidence is presented that the reciprocal exchange of social services among chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes ) rests on cognitive abilities that allow current behavior to be contingent upon aExpand
Market forces predict grooming reciprocity in female baboons
We argue that grooming is a commodity that female primates can trade, either for itself or in exchange for other services (sensu biological markets theory) and that the decision to do either willExpand
Reciprocity and interchange of grooming and ‘support’ in captive chimpanzees
Reciprocity and interchange of grooming and coalition formation of captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, were studied at a group level as (partial) correlations between an actor matrix and a receiverExpand
Reciprocity and partner preference in grooming of female blue monkeys
Grooming among adult and older juvenile females in a wild group of blue monkeys (Cercopithecus mitis stuhlmanni) is analyzed and related to agonistic behavior. Both grooming and agonistic behaviorExpand
The similarity principle underlying social bonding among female rhesus monkeys.
TLDR
A simpler, more encompassing principle underlying interfemale attraction is proposed, according to which rhesus females establish bonds with females whom they most resemble, which is based on multivariate analyses and a comparison of theoretical models. Expand
An Ecological Model of Female-Bonded Primate Groups
TLDR
A model is presented to account for the evolution of FB groups in terms of ecological pressures on female relationships and suggests that relationships in most FB groups are ultimately related to feeding competition. Expand
Grooming, alliances and reciprocal altruism in vervet monkeys
TLDR
The field experiments on vervet monkeys are demonstrated to demonstrate that grooming between unrelated individuals increases the probability that they will subsequently attend to each others' solicitations for aid. Expand
Cohort size and the allocation of social effort by female mountain baboons
TLDR
Compared the grooming interactions of adult females from four troops in the Drakensberg mountains, it is argued that females attempt to groom all other females as well as sustain closer relationships with a few females through longer bouts of reciprocated grooming, likely to facilitate fission. Expand
Social Evolution in Primates: The Role of Ecological Factors and Male Behaviour
TLDR
The findings suggest that infanticide is of equal importance to ecological factors, with which it may interact in sometimes complex way, in shaping primate social systems. Expand
Evidence for an important social role of allogrooming in a platyrrhine primate
Allogrooming behaviour was analysed in a wild group of tufted capuchin monkeys,Cebus apellain Iguazu National Park, Argentina. Evidence is provided that allogrooming in this platyrrhine speciesExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...