The use of museum specimens to reconstruct the genetic variability and relationships of extinct populations

@article{Roy2005TheUO,
  title={The use of museum specimens to reconstruct the genetic variability and relationships of extinct populations},
  author={Michael S. Roy and Derek J. Girman and Andrea C. Taylor and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Experientia},
  year={2005},
  volume={50},
  pages={551-557}
}
In this review, we discuss the use of DNA from museum specimens to address conservation genetic questions. We provide four examples from our previous studies of the northern hairy-nosed wombat, African wild dog, Ethiopian wolf and red wolf. These species were genetically surveyed using two molecular approaches: first, analysis of short sequences in the mitochondrial genome using species-specific primers, and second, analysis of hypervariable microsatellite loci. The studies demonstrate that… Expand
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