The use of echolocation by the wandering shrew (Sorex vagrans)

@article{Buchler1976TheUO,
  title={The use of echolocation by the wandering shrew (Sorex vagrans)},
  author={Edward R. Buchler},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1976},
  volume={24},
  pages={858-873}
}
Abstract Six wandering shrews ( Sorex vagrans ) were trained to echolocate the position of a platform and drop to it. They preferentially directed their ultrasonic emissions at the platform. With their ears plugged, they were unable to locate it above chance levels even though they increased their emission rate. Shrews with hollow tubes in their ears performed as effectively as controls. Echolocating shrews, trained on an elevated Y-maze, detected a 15×15-cm flat metal barrier to a distance of… 
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