The use of dietary supplements by athletes

@article{Maughan2007TheUO,
  title={The use of dietary supplements by athletes},
  author={Ronald J. Maughan and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Depiesse and Hans Geyer},
  journal={Journal of Sports Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={25},
  pages={S103 - S113}
}
Abstract Many athletes use dietary supplements as part of their regular training or competition routine, including about 85% of elite track and field athletes. Supplements commonly used include vitamins, minerals, protein, creatine, and various “ergogenic” compounds. These supplements are often used without a full understanding or evaluation of the potential benefits and risks associated with their use, and without consultation with a sports nutrition professional. A few supplements may be… 

Dietary supplements for aquatic sports.

  • W. DeraveK. Tipton
  • Medicine
    International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism
  • 2014
TLDR
There is good evidence from laboratory studies and some evidence from field studies to support health or performance benefits from appropriate use of a few supplements, but the available evidence from studies of aquatic sports is small and is often contradictory.

IOC Consensus Statement: Dietary Supplements and the High-Performance Athlete.

TLDR
Protection of the athlete's health and awareness of the potential for harm must be paramount, and expert professional opinion and assistance is strongly advised before embarking on supplement use.

Athletes and Supplements: Prevalence and Perspectives.

  • I. GartheR. Maughan
  • Education
    International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism
  • 2018
TLDR
In the high-performance culture typical of elite sport, athletes may use supplements regardless of possible risks, and a discussion around medical, physiological, cultural, and ethical questions may be warranted to ensure that the athlete has the information needed to make an informed choice.

IOC consensus statement: dietary supplements and the high-performance athlete

TLDR
The appropriate use of some supplements can benefit the athlete, but others may harm the athlete’s health, performance, and/or livelihood and reputation and expert professional opinion and assistance is strongly advised before an athlete embarks on supplement use.

Dietary supplementation practices in Canadian high-performance athletes.

TLDR
It was concluded that supplementation rates are not declining in Canada, current advisors on supplementation for this athletic population are not credible, and sports medicine physicians and dietitians need to consider proactive strategies to improve their influence on supplementation practices in these elite athletes.

Dietary supplement use among elite young German athletes.

TLDR
The survey shows that supplement use is common and widespread among German elite young athletes, and stands in strong contrast to recommendations by leading sport organizations against supplement use by underage athletes.

Prevalence and patterns of dietary supplement use in elite Spanish athletes

TLDR
Dietary supplementation appears to be widely used in sport with a considerable proportion of athletes consuming supplements with low level of scientific evidence, and athletes seem to rely on inadequate sources of information and may be largely unaware of sources to detect supplement contamination.

Prevalence of the use of effective ergogenic aids among professional athletes.

TLDR
Competitors who use supplements over those who choose not to, seems to reflect the continuous lack of the athletes' sufficient awareness of the effectiveness, safety, and health benefits of dietary supplementation that enhances physical performance.

Dietary supplements for athletes: Emerging trends and recurring themes

TLDR
Dietary supplements are widely used at all levels of sport andDifficulties arise when new evidence appears to support novel supplements: in recent years, β-alanine has become popular, and the use of nitrate and arginine is growing.

Evaluation of congruence among dietary supplement use and motivation for supplementation in young, Canadian athletes

TLDR
Congruencies exist between performance rationales and supplementation for common ergogenic aids, however, less so for vitamin and mineral supplements, vitamin-enriched water, and plant extracts.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 77 REFERENCES

Contamination of dietary supplements and positive drug tests in sport

TLDR
There is now evidence that some of the apparently legitimate dietary supplements on sale contain ingredients that are not declared on the label but that are prohibited by the doping regulations of the International Olympic Committee and of the World Anti-Doping Agency.

Nutritional supplement practices in UK junior national track and field athletes

  • A. Nieper
  • Medicine, Education
    British Journal of Sports Medicine
  • 2005
TLDR
The findings of this investigation could be used to enable the sports dietician and physician to identify common misconceptions held by adolescent athletes regarding nutritional supplements and to implement educational programs, which should include members of the non-medical support team.

The use of nutritional supplements among master athletes.

TLDR
The results of this study indicate that nutritional supplement users in master athletics show no specific user profile and physicians should inform master competitive athletes of the dangers of testing positive for doping substances due to their intake of nutritional supplements and advise them accordingly.

Dietary supplements for football

TLDR
Physical training and competition in football markedly increase the need for macro- and micronutrient intake, and therefore the ingestion of any supplement must be assessed in training before being used in competition.

American College of Sports Medicine roundtable. The physiological and health effects of oral creatine supplementation.

TLDR
Although Cr supplementation exhibits small but significant physiological and performance changes, the increases in performance are realized during very specific exercise conditions, suggesting that the apparent high expectations for performance enhancement, evident by the extensive use of Cr supplementation, are inordinate.

Nutrition and dietary supplements.

Caffeine, body fluid-electrolyte balance, and exercise performance.

  • L. Armstrong
  • Medicine
    International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism
  • 2002
TLDR
The scientific literature suggests that athletes and recreational enthusiasts will not incur detrimental fluid-electrolyte imbalances if they consume CB in moderation and eat a typical U.S. diet.

Dietary supplements.

  • P. Massey
  • Medicine
    The Medical clinics of North America
  • 2002
TLDR
Information about dietary supplements is becoming more common in the popular medical literature and is creating increased curiosity and an increased awareness, compelling physicians to become aware of dietary supplements.

Practice Tips: Protein and amino acid needs for training and bulking up

TLDR
This edition has been revised with an emphasis on updating knowledge and practice that developed since 2000 and provides valuable new information on: female athlete triad and the new ACSM/IOC position statement in 2005.

Caffeine ingestion and fluid balance: a review.

  • R. MaughanJ. Griffin
  • Medicine
    Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association
  • 2003
TLDR
There would appear to be no clear basis for refraining from caffeine containing drinks in situations where fluid balance might be compromised and the most ecologically valid of the published studies offers no support for the suggestion that consumption of caffeine-containing beverages as part of a normal lifestyle leads to fluid loss in excess of the volume ingested or is associated with poor hydration status.
...