The use of conspecific reproductive success for breeding patch selection in terrestrial migratory species

@article{Boulinier1997TheUO,
  title={The use of conspecific reproductive success for breeding patch selection in terrestrial migratory species},
  author={Thierry Boulinier and Etienne G. J. Danchin},
  journal={Evolutionary Ecology},
  year={1997},
  volume={11},
  pages={505-517}
}
SummaryClassical models of breeding habitat selection rarely deal with the question of information gathering for patch quality assessment. In this paper, we present two models comparing the fitness outcomes of behavioural strategies based on conspecific reproductive success as a cue to assess local environmental quality before selecting a new breeding habitat. The models deal with two phases of the life-cycle of a territorial migratory species: recruitment to a breeding population (model 1) and… 

Figures from this paper

When to use public information for breeding habitat selection? The role of environmental predictability and density dependence
TLDR
A two-patch, game-theoretical model is built to compare the success of a strategy of breeding habitat selection based on patch reproductive success relative to four other strategies, showing how the efficiency of strategies in tracking variations in patch quality depend on environmental predictability and costs linked to density dependence, themselves linked to the dynamics of spatial aggregation of individuals.
The use of conspecific reproductive success for breeding habitat selection in a non‐colonial, hole‐nesting species, the collared flycatcher
TLDR
It is suggested that males of low competitive ability may either use PRS to assess the level of expected intraspecific competition the following year, and choose to disperse from high PRS woodlands, or be forced to disperse when PRS is high because of strong competition.
CONSPECIFIC REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS AND BREEDING HABITAT SELECTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDY OF COLONIALITY
TLDR
It is suggested that both first breeders and adults rely on the reproductive success of conspecifics as “public information” to assess their own chances of breeding successfully in a given patch and to make settling decisions when deciding whether to emigrate.
Public information affects breeding dispersal in a colonial bird: kittiwakes cue on neighbours
TLDR
The attendance of breeders and prospectors was strongly affected by the local level of breeding success, resulting in differential site fidelity and recruitment, which suggests that individuals used information conveyed by conspecific breeding performance to make decisions relative to breeding site selection.
Testing habitat copying in breeding habitat selection in a species adapted to variable environments
TLDR
The habitat copying hypothesis states that animals use the reproductive performance of conspecifics to evaluate habitat quality and choose their future breeding site, and data from Audouin’s Gull Larus audouinii is used to analyse subcolony (as patch) choice within a colony to suggest this may be one of the strategies used by the species in selecting its breeding habitat.
Breeding habitat selection in cliff swallows: the effect of conspecific reproductive success on colony choice
TLDR
Cliff swallows probably use conspecific breeding performance in selecting colonies, one component of habitat selection that also includes attraction to Conspecifics and assessment of an individual's own success.
Can non-breeding be a cost of breeding dispersal?
TLDR
The hypothesis that dispersal may result in not being able to breed is supported, as non-breeding (which can be interpreted as an extreme form of breeding failure) may reveal costs of various previous activities.
Settlement decisions in blue tits: difference in the use of social information according to age and individual success
TLDR
The results support the importance of social cues for blue tits’ settlement and suggest that settlement is influenced by multiple cues, which may reveal information on different aspects of habitat and be available at different moments.
Breeding habitat selection behaviors in heterogeneous environments: implications for modeling reintroduction
TLDR
The role of explicit breeding habitat selection strategies on the establishment pattern of reintroduced populations and their persistence is investigated and the crucial role of oriented habitat selection behavior and non ideal habitat selection in movement modeling is emphasized, particularly for reintroduction.
SELECTION: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDY OF COLONIALITY
TLDR
Testing the performance-based nonspecific attraction hypothesis of the Black-legged Kittiwake suggests that both first breeders and adults rely on the repro- ductive success of conspecifics as "public information" to assess their own chances of breeding successfully in a given patch and to make settling decisions.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 92 REFERENCES
Timing of prospecting and the value of information in a colonial breeding bird
TLDR
It was found that the bulk of prospecting occurred when the best information on local reproductive success was available, consistent with the potential use of conspecific reproductive success as a proximate cue for habitat selection.
Habitat choice in breeding seabirds: when to cross the information barrier
TLDR
The information barrier hypothesis is suggested: the presence of nesting birds may furnish cues about local breeding conditions that may deter dispersal to new habitat, even though good breeding sites may be available elsewhere.
Sources, Sinks, and Habitat Selection: A Landscape Perspective on Population Dynamics
TLDR
The model allows us to compare the relative contribution of different types of habitats to a species' growth rate and population size and predict how the loss of habitat of a particular type may affect a population.
Effects of Breeding Experience and Familiarity on Site Fidelity in Female Red‐Winged Blackbirds
TLDR
There is more social constraint on changing territories and marshes, especially within breeding years, than previously suspected, and although mate fidelity is relatively weak and unimportant, male "neighborhoods" or "breeding groups" affect female nesting success and, hence, influence movements.
Philopatry, Nest-Site Fidelity, and Reproductive Performance in Buffleheads
TLDR
The results supported Rohwer and Anderson (1988) prediction that female ducks should gain in terms of reproductive success by returning to a familiar area, and supported the prediction that homing by females should increase their reproductive success.
Patch assessment in foraging flocks of European starlings: evidence for the use of public information
TLDR
This study provides the first evidence of public information use in a patch assessment problem and suggests that starlings use public information only when it is easily available and ignore it under incompatible conditions.
Behavioural constraints and conservation biology: Conspecific attraction and recruitment.
TLDR
The implications of conspecific attraction for biologists who wish to conserve endangered species that are living in fragmented habitats are discussed.
Conspecific Attraction and Aggregation in Territorial Species
  • J. Stamps
  • Geography
    The American Naturalist
  • 1988
For many years, field studies of birds have suggested that territorial individuals may be attracted to one another, forming territorial clusters independent of resource distributions. However,
Habitat Selection and Population Interactions: The Search for Mechanism
The study of habitat selection and population interactions has a history about as long as any integrative topic in ecology. Its literature is classically scientific in the sense that it combines
Seabird colony distributions suggest competition for food supplies during the breeding season
TLDR
An analysis of interactions between spatial distribution and size of seabird breeding colonies is presented and support is provided for Ashmole's suggestion that seabirds numbers may be limited by intraspecific competition for food around colonies during the breeding season.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...