• Corpus ID: 26815958

The use of a membrane feeding technique to determine the infection rate of Culicoides imicola (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) for 2 bluetongue virus serotypes in South Africa.

@article{Venter1991TheUO,
  title={The use of a membrane feeding technique to determine the infection rate of Culicoides imicola (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae) for 2 bluetongue virus serotypes in South Africa.},
  author={Gert Johannes Venter and Elaine Hill and I T Pajor and E. M. Nevill},
  journal={The Onderstepoort journal of veterinary research},
  year={1991},
  volume={58 1},
  pages={
          5-9
        }
}
Culicoides spp. in the Lowveld of the northern Transvaal, Republic of South Africa, were fed bluetongue virus serotypes 3 and 6 and African horsesickness virus serotype 1 through latex and chicken skin membranes. After an incubation period of 10 days at 25-27 degrees C, the infection rate of C. imicola for bluetongue virus serotypes 3 and 6 was established at 31% and 24% respectively. No African horsesickness virus could be recovered. The membrane feeding technique and handling procedures… 

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