The use of Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) for surveying and monitoring emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) infestations in eastern North America

@article{Careless2013TheUO,
  title={The use of Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) for surveying and monitoring emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) infestations in eastern North America},
  author={Philip D. Careless and Stephen A. Marshall and Bruce D. Gill},
  journal={The Canadian Entomologist},
  year={2013},
  volume={146},
  pages={90 - 105}
}
Abstract The beetle-hunting wasp, Cerceris fumipennis Say (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae), native to eastern North America, provisions its subterranean nest almost exclusively with adult metallic wood-boring beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), including the destructive emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, EAB). This wasp provides a unique opportunity to survey indigenous and nonindigenous buprestid diversity. We discuss the accessibility, sustainability, and productivity of C. fumipennis… 
Colony distribution and prey diversity of Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) in British Columbia
TLDR
These represent the first prey records for C. fumipennis in BC and with the exception of P. drummondi are new prey recordsfor this wasp.
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What’s killing the green menace: mortality factors affecting the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) in North America?
  • D. Lyons
  • Biology, Environmental Science
    The Canadian Entomologist
  • 2014
TLDR
An Asian species that was introduced into North America in the mid-1990s and has the potential to devastate populations of Fraxinus Linnaeus (Oleaceae) species, Agrilus planipennis is a freeze-intolerant species and perishes when its tissues freeze.
Collection of Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) by Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) in North Carolina: Case Study at One Nesting Site
TLDR
Until evidence to the contrary is available, this long activity period is best interpreted as the extended emergence of a single generation rather than as a partial second generation of wasps.
Comparison of Buprestidae collected by Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) with those collected by purple prism traps
TLDR
Two nondestructive methods for monitoring metallic wood‐boring beetles are compared and it is found that a combination of both techniques may provide the most complete temporal coverage of buprestid activity in a given area.
NEST PROVISIONING AND HOMING BEHAVIOR OF CERCERIS FUMIPENNIS (HYMENOPTERA, CRABRONIDAE): A USEFUL TOOL IN THE BIOSURVEILLANCE OF BUPRESTID BEETLES
TLDR
The biology and life history of C. fumipennis is focused on to better understand its use in long-term pest monitoring, in particular the nest provisioning and homing behaviors of this species are examined.
Utilizing Prey Captures by Cerceris Fumipennis Say (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) for a Survey of Buprestidae (Coleoptera) in New England, USA
TLDR
Rarefaction analysis of data pooled by state suggested that more species potentially collected by C. fumipennis exist but were not sampled, and 56 new state records for 40 species are documented in New England through July 2018.
Two Observations of Assassin Bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Feasting on Adult Jewel Beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), with Notes on Adults of Other Buprestid Species and Their Predators
TLDR
The impetus for this note began when two of us (JRN and RLW) were collecting on 5 October 2009 at 6 km SW Cacaloxtepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, where JRN photographed an assassin bug, Apiomerus cf.
Year-to-Year Variation in Prey Capture by Cerceris fumipennis (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae) at Two Sites in North Carolina
TLDR
Reports on variation in prey capture by C. fumipennis at two sites in North Carolina over a 4-yr period suggest the importance of continued biosurveillance at sites with known wasp aggregations as emerald ash borer and other invasive pests spread into and throughout North Carolina.
Detection and sampling of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) infestations
  • K. Ryall
  • Environmental Science, Biology
    The Canadian Entomologist
  • 2015
TLDR
Further research is needed to increase the efficacy and efficiency of early detection tools and techniques, including cost/benefit analysis of the various sampling options, increased understanding of patterns of initial infestation across the landscape, development of sampling programs for both detection and delimitation, and development of sequential sampling programs to estimate EAB density.
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TLDR
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