The two‐process model of sleep regulation: a reappraisal

@article{Borbly2016TheTM,
  title={The two‐process model of sleep regulation: a reappraisal},
  author={Alexander A. Borb{\'e}ly and Serge Daan and Anna Wirz-Justice and Tom Deboer},
  journal={Journal of Sleep Research},
  year={2016},
  volume={25}
}
In the last three decades the two‐process model of sleep regulation has served as a major conceptual framework in sleep research. It has been applied widely in studies on fatigue and performance and to dissect individual differences in sleep regulation. The model posits that a homeostatic process (Process S) interacts with a process controlled by the circadian pacemaker (Process C), with time‐courses derived from physiological and behavioural variables. The model simulates successfully the… 
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