The trophic fingerprint of marine fisheries

@article{Branch2010TheTF,
  title={The trophic fingerprint of marine fisheries},
  author={Trevor A. Branch and Reg A. Watson and Elizabeth A. Fulton and Simon Jennings and Carey R. McGilliard and Grace T. Pablico and Daniel Ricard and Sean Tracey},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={468},
  pages={431-435}
}
Biodiversity indicators provide a vital window on the state of the planet, guiding policy development and management. The most widely adopted marine indicator is mean trophic level (MTL) from catches, intended to detect shifts from high-trophic-level predators to low-trophic-level invertebrates and plankton-feeders. This indicator underpins reported trends in human impacts, declining when predators collapse (“fishing down marine food webs”) and when low-trophic-level fisheries expand (“fishing… Expand
Fisheries: Measuring biodiversity in marine ecosystems
  • J. Powers
  • Environmental Science, Medicine
  • Nature
  • 2010
TLDR
Comparison of model predictions of the widely adopted marine indicator, mean trophic level (MTL) derived from reported catches, with actual ecosystem MTL suggests that fishing has intensified throughout all levels of marine food webs. Expand
An evaluation of underlying mechanisms for “fishing down marine food webs”
Since the concept of “fishing down marine food webs” was first proposed in 1998, mean trophic level of fisheries landings (MTL) has become one of the most widely used indicators to assess the impactsExpand
Trophic signatures of seabirds suggest shifts in oceanic ecosystems
TLDR
The results show that multiple species of fish-consuming seabirds may track the complex changes occurring in marine ecosystems, and machine learning models reveal that trophic position trends have a complex set of drivers including climate, commercial fisheries, and ecomorphology. Expand
Linking the Trophic Fingerprint of Groundfishes to Ecosystem Structure and Function in the California Current
TLDR
A decline in the ecosystem MTL of groundfishes in the same ecosystem from 2003 to 2011 is documented, the proximate cause of which was a decrease in the biomass of higher TL groundfishing. Expand
Trophic level-based indicators to track fishing impacts across marine ecosystems
Trophic level (TL)-based indicators have been widely used to examine fishing impacts in aquatic ecosystems and the induced biodiversity changes. However, much debate has ensued regardingExpand
An assessment of “fishing down marine food webs” in coastal states during 1950–2010
Mean trophic level of fishery landings (MTL) is one of the most widely used biodiversity indicators to assess the impacts of fishing. Based on the landing data compiled by Food and AgricultureExpand
Fishing through (and up) Alaskan food webs
We used a 112-year time series of Alaskan fishery catches to test competing hypotheses concerning trends in mean catch trophic level, a widely used indicator of fisheries sustainability. We foundExpand
Region-based MTI: resolving geographic expansion in the Marine Trophic Index
The Marine Trophic Index (MTI), which tracks the mean trophic level of fishery catches from an ecosystem, generally, but not always, tracks changes in mean trophic level of an ensemble of exploitedExpand
Are We Catching What They Eat? Moving Beyond Trends in the Mean Trophic Level of Catch
The mean trophic level of fisheries catch is commonly used to describe and assess temporal trends in fisheries. Though its value as an indicator to evaluate the relative health of fisheries in marineExpand
Fishing down then up the food web of an invaded lake
TLDR
It is shown that while declining MTL can occur in a freshwater lake, the trajectory can be altered by a switch to recreational fishing, as well as stocking and invasive species. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 39 REFERENCES
Fishing through (and up) Alaskan food webs
We used a 112-year time series of Alaskan fishery catches to test competing hypotheses concerning trends in mean catch trophic level, a widely used indicator of fisheries sustainability. We foundExpand
Fishing through marine food webs.
TLDR
Analysis of trends in fishery landings in 48 large marine ecosystems worldwide finds that fishing down the food web was pervasive but that the sequential addition mechanism was by far the most common one underlying declines in the mean trophic level of landings. Expand
Exploring the dynamics of ecological indicators using food web models fitted to time series of abundance and catch data
Abstract Previously, standardized snap-shot models of the Southern Benguela (1980–1989), Southern Humboldt (1992) and Southern Catalan Sea (1994) ecosystems were examined and found to facilitateExpand
FISHING DOWN MARINE FOOD WEB: IT IS FAR MORE PERVASIVE THAN WE THOUGHT
The widespread call for a transition toward “ecosystem-based” fisheries manage ment implies the development and testing of sustainability indicators suitable for inferences on the status of theExpand
Which ecological indicators can robustly detect effects of fishing
Many ecological indicators have been proposed to detect and describe the effects of fishing on marine ecosystems, but few have been evaluated formally. Here, simulation models of two marine systemsExpand
Reanalyses of Gulf of Mexico fisheries data: Landings can be misleading in assessments of fisheries and fisheries ecosystems
TLDR
It is suggested that the low mean trophic level index calculated in the earlier article did not reflect the overall condition of the fishery ecosystem, and that the 10% rule for collapse should not be interpreted out of context in the GOM or elsewhere. Expand
Fishing down marine food webs
TLDR
The mean trophic level of the species groups reported in Food and Agricultural Organization global fisheries statistics declined from 1950 to 1994, and results indicate that present exploitation patterns are unsustainable. Expand
Apparent changes in the trophic composition of world marine harvests: the perspective from the FAO capture database
TLDR
Punctuated equilibrium, involving actual changes in ecosystems, rather than just continuous change in the relative harvest rates of species in a given ecosystem, is suggested as an important phenomenon, reflecting both ecological change and changing exploitation strategies. Expand
Global trends in world fisheries: impacts on marine ecosystems and food security
This contribution, which reviews some broad trends in human history and in the history of fishing, argues that sustainability, however defined, rarely if ever occurred as a result of an explicitExpand
A Tentative Analysis of the Trophic Levels of North Sea Fish
Trophic levels of basic food items, feeding habits and trophic levels of various North Sea fishes have been derived from historical references and the MAFF North Sea Groundfish Survey data in 1977,Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...