The triploid East African Highland Banana (EAHB) genepool is genetically uniform arising from a single ancestral clone that underwent population expansion by vegetative propagation

@article{Kitavi2015TheTE,
  title={The triploid East African Highland Banana (EAHB) genepool is genetically uniform arising from a single ancestral clone that underwent population expansion by vegetative propagation},
  author={Mercy Kitavi and Tim Downing and Jim H. Lorenzen and Deborah Karamura and Margaret Onyango and Moses Nyine and Morag E Ferguson and Charles Spillane},
  journal={Theoretical and Applied Genetics},
  year={2015},
  volume={129},
  pages={547-561}
}
Key messageAll East African Highland Banana varieties are genetically uniform having arisen from a single cloneintroduced to Africa.AbstractEast African Highland bananas (EAHBs) are a subgroup of triploid (AAA genome) bananas of importance to food security in the Great Lakes region of Africa. Little is known about their genetic variation, population structure and evolutionary history. Ninety phenotypically diverse EAHB cultivars were genotyped at 100 SSR microsatellite markers to investigate… 
Heritable epigenetic diversity for conservation and utilization of epigenetic germplasm resources of clonal East African Highland banana (EAHB) accessions
TLDR
The results indicate that the phenotypic diversity of near-isogenic EAHBs is mirrored by considerable DNA methylation variation, which is transmitted between generations by both vegetative reproduction and seed reproduction, a basis for developing strategies for conservation of epigenetic resources and for integration of epimarkers into crop breeding programmes.
Molecular and Cytogenetic Study of East African Highland Banana
TLDR
The results suggest that EAHB cultivars originated from a single hybrid clone with M. acuminata ssp.
East African diploid and triploid bananas: a genetic complex transported from South-East Asia
TLDR
Understanding of the relations between the components of this complex and identifying their Asian wild relatives and related cultivars will be a valuable asset in breeding programmes and will boost the genetic improvement of East African bananas, but also of other globally important subgroups, in particular the AAA Cavendish.
Molecular and cytological characterization of the global Musa germplasm collection provides insights into the treasure of banana diversity
TLDR
This report summarizes the results of systematic cytological and molecular characterization of the Musa ITC collection and confirms the previous morphological based classification for 84% of ITC accessions analyzed.
Trait variation and genetic diversity in a banana genomic selection training population
TLDR
The hypothesis that trait variations in bananas are not affected by cross combination, cycle, field management and their interaction with genotype is tested and it is likely that the predictive ability of traits that are difficult to phenotype will be similar to less difficult traits they are highly correlated with.
Crossbreeding East African Highland Bananas: Lessons Learnt Relevant to the Botany of the Crop After 21 Years of Genetic Enhancement
TLDR
To assess the progress and efficiency of the EAHB breeding program at IITA, Sendusu in Uganda, data on pollinations, seeds generated and germinated, plus hybrids selected between 1995 and 2015 were analyzed.
Suitability of existing Musa morphological descriptors to characterize East African highland ‘matooke’ bananas
TLDR
Only 10 out of 31 descriptors studied were stable in the 11 cultivars and therefore are not suitable to distinguish between cultivars within this group, Nonetheless, these 10 descriptors may be useful for distinguishing the East African highland bananas as a group from other groups of bananas.
Chromosome painting in cultivated banana and their wild relatives (Musa spp.) reveals differences in chromosome structure
TLDR
Comparison of karyotype analysis in a set of wild Musa species and edible banana clones revealed chromosomal translocations in subspecies of Musa acuminata, their intra-specific hybrids as well as in M. balbisiana and clarified genomic constitution and evolution of aneuploid Banana clones, which seem to be common among the polyploid banana accessions.
Association genetics of bunch weight and its component traits in East African highland banana (Musa spp. AAA group)
TLDR
The clustering of significant SNPs on chromosome 3 supported the hypothesis that fruit filling in this population was under control of a few quantitative trait loci with major effects.
Chromosome Painting in Cultivated Bananas and Their Wild Relatives (Musa spp.) Reveals Differences in Chromosome Structure
TLDR
Comparison in situ hybridization with chromosome-arm-specific oligo painting probes was used for comparative karyotype analysis in a set of wild Musa species and edible banana clones and revealed large differences in chromosome structure, discriminating individual accessions, which permitted the identification of putative progenitors of cultivated clones and clarified the genomic constitution and evolution of aneuploid banana clones.
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 86 REFERENCES
Analysis of genetic diversity and relationships in East African banana germplasm
TLDR
It is shown that RAPD markers can readily dissect genetic differences between the closely related highland bananas and provide a basis for the selection of parents for improvement of this germplasm.
Genetic Diversity Among East African Highland Bananas For Female Fertility
TLDR
The objective of the study reported herein was to identify female fertile highland bananas that can be used in a cross breeding program and to determine the influence of pistil morphological traits on seed set.
A saturated SSR/DArT linkage map of Musa acuminata addressing genome rearrangements among bananas
TLDR
A methodological approach is illustrated, transferable to other species, to investigate the mapping of structural rearrangements and determine their consequences on marker segregation in M. acuminata cultivars, taking into account hypotheses on the structural heterozygosity of the parents.
Molecular characterisation of Musa L. cultivars cultivated in Malawi using microsatellite markers
TLDR
Cluster analysis showed that most cultivars were dissimilar probably due to multiplicity of mutations generated by high rate of cultivar multiplication by farmers, however, genetic relationships among some cultivars showed some possible synonyms.
Genetic diversity and population structure of Musa accessions in ex situ conservation
TLDR
The data generated by flow cytometry, ITS and SSR supported the hypothesis about the occurrence of homeologue recombination between A and B genomes, leading to discrepancies in the number of sets or portions from each parental genome.
Genetic diversity in an African plantain core collection using AFLP and RAPD markers
TLDR
A small group of cultivars from Cameroon were separated from the bulk of other plantains, suggesting that Cameroon may harbour accessions with useful or rare genes for widening the genetic base of breeding populations derived from the plantains.
Molecular Characterization of Banana Cultivars (Musa Spp.) From Egypt Using AFLP
TLDR
A greater effort should be directed at collecting and characterizing banana cultivars from all over Egypt in a national type project and linking molecular genotypic studies with the current classification system of Musa cultivars based purely on morphological traits.
Discovery of nucleotide polymorphisms in the Musa gene pool by Ecotilling
TLDR
It is concluded that Ecotilling is suitable for diversity studies in Musa, that it can be considered for functional genomics studies and as tool in selecting germplasm for traditional and mutation breeding approaches.
Origins and Domestication of Cultivated Banana Inferred from Chloroplast and Nuclear Genes
TLDR
This study confirmed the origin of cultivated banana as arising from multiple intra- and inter-specific hybridization events, and showed that cultivated banana may have not suffered a severe genetic bottleneck during the domestication process.
Analysis of genetic diversity in banana cultivars (Musa cvs.) from the South of Oman using AFLP markers and classification by phylogenetic, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses
TLDR
The results obtained show that AFLP can be used to differentiate the banana cultivars and significant differences were found between the clusters found with molecular markers and those clusters created by previous studies using morphological analysis.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...