The trials of imperialism: Radhabinod Pal’s dissent at the Tokyo tribunal

@article{Varadarajan2015TheTO,
  title={The trials of imperialism: Radhabinod Pal’s dissent at the Tokyo tribunal},
  author={Latha Varadarajan},
  journal={European Journal of International Relations},
  year={2015},
  volume={21},
  pages={793 - 815}
}
  • Latha Varadarajan
  • Published 1 December 2015
  • History, Law, Political Science
  • European Journal of International Relations
At the end of the Second World War, the leaders of the defeated Axis powers were tried for crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity in two specially established international military tribunals. Unlike at the vaunted Nuremberg trials, the judgment of the less-illustrious Tokyo tribunal was not unanimous. In his dissenting opinion, Justice Radhabinod Pal of India comprehensively disagreed with all aspects of the trial, finding all defendants “not guilty” of the charges… 
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