The tourniquet controversy.

@article{Navein2003TheTC,
  title={The tourniquet controversy.},
  author={John F. Navein and Robin M. Coupland and Roderick L R Dunn},
  journal={The Journal of trauma},
  year={2003},
  volume={54 5 Suppl},
  pages={
          S219-20
        }
}
Describing a tourniquet as “an instrument of the devil that sometimes saves a life” encapsulates the considerable risk to a limb when a tourniquet is applied to arrest life-threatening extremity hemorrhage. The use of tourniquets is widespread in both military and civilian environments, particularly in the developing world; however, the balance of risk is unclear, and its efficacy is controversial and unduly influenced by folklore and dramatic Hollywood images. The tourniquet controversy… 
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Reading is a need and a hobby at once and this condition is the on that will make you feel that you must read.
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