The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance

@article{Higham2014TheTA,
  title={The timing and spatiotemporal patterning of Neanderthal disappearance},
  author={Thomas F.G. Higham and Katerina Douka and Rachel Wood and Christopher Bronk Ramsey and Fiona Brock and Laura S. Basell and Marta Camps and Alvaro Arrizabalaga and Javier Baena and Cecillio Barroso-Ru{\'i}z and Christopher A. Bergman and Coralie Boitard and Paolo Boscato and Miguel Caparr{\'o}s and Nicholas J. Conard and Christelle Draily and Alain Froment and Bertila Galv{\'a}n and Paolo Gambassini and Alejandro Garc{\'i}a-Moreno and Stefano Grimaldi and Paul Haesaerts and Brigitte Holt and Mar{\'i}a Jos{\'e} Iriarte-Chiapusso and Arthur J. Jelinek and Jes{\'u}s Francisco Jord{\'a} Pardo and Jos{\'e}-Manuel Ma{\'i}llo-Fern{\'a}ndez and Anat Marom and Juli{\`a} Maroto and Mario Men{\'e}ndez and Laure Metz and Eug{\`e}ne Morin and Adriana Moroni and Fabio Negrino and Eleni Panagopoulou and Marco Peresani and St{\'e}phane Pirson and Marco de la Rasilla and Julien Riel‐Salvatore and Annamaria Ronchitelli and David Santamar{\'i}a and Patrick Semal and Ludovic Slimak and Joaquim Soler and Narc{\'i}s Soler and Aritza Villaluenga and Ron Pinhasi and Roger M. Jacobi},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2014},
  volume={512},
  pages={306-309}
}
The timing of Neanderthal disappearance and the extent to which they overlapped with the earliest incoming anatomically modern humans (AMHs) in Eurasia are key questions in palaeoanthropology. Determining the spatiotemporal relationship between the two populations is crucial if we are to understand the processes, timing and reasons leading to the disappearance of Neanderthals and the likelihood of cultural and genetic exchange. Serious technical challenges, however, have hindered reliable… 
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