The thought translation device: a neurophysiological approach to communication in total motor paralysis

@article{Kbler1999TheTT,
  title={The thought translation device: a neurophysiological approach to communication in total motor paralysis},
  author={Andrea K{\"u}bler and Boris Kotchoubey and Thilo Hinterberger and Nimr Ghanayim and Juri Perelmouter and Margarete Schauer and Christoph Fritsch and Edward Taub and Niels Birbaumer},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={1999},
  volume={124},
  pages={223-232}
}
 A thought translation device (TTD) for brain-computer communication is described. Three patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), with total motor paralysis, were trained for several months. In order to enable such patients to communicate without any motor activity, a technique was developed where subjects learn to control their slow cortical potentials (SCP) in a 2-s rhythm, producing either cortical negativity or positivity according to the task requirement. SCP… CONTINUE READING
134 Citations
27 References
Similar Papers

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 134 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 27 references

Operant control of slow brain potentials: a tool in the investigation of the potential’s meaning and its relation to attentional dysfunction

  • N Birbaumer
  • N (eds) Self-regulation of the brain and…
  • 1984
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

1981a) EEG and slow cortical potentials in anticipation of mental tasks

  • N Birbaumer, T Elbert, W Lutzenberger, B Rockstroh, J Schwartz
  • 1981
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

Biofeedback on event-related potentials of the brain

  • N Birbaumer, T Elbert, B Rockstroh, W Lutzenberger
  • Int J Psychol
  • 1981
Highly Influential
4 Excerpts

Slow cortical potentials : their origin , meaning , and clinical use

  • N Birbaumer
  • 1997
1 Excerpt

Slow cortical potentials: their origin, meaning, and clinical use. In: Boxtel GJM von, Böcker KBE (eds) Brain and behavior – past, present and future

  • N Birbaumer
  • 1997
1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…