The theory of games and the evolution of animal conflicts.

@article{Smith1974TheTO,
  title={The theory of games and the evolution of animal conflicts.},
  author={John Maynard Smith},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={1974},
  volume={47 1},
  pages={
          209-21
        }
}
  • J. M. Smith
  • Published 1 September 1974
  • Biology, Political Science, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
The evolution of behaviour patterns used in animal conflicts is discussed, using models based on the theory of games. The paper extends arguments used by Maynard Smith & Price (1973) showing that ritualized behaviour can evolve by individual selection. The concept of an evolutionarily stable strategy, or ESS, is defined. Two types of ritualized contests are distinguished, “tournaments” and “displays”; the latter, defined as contests without physical contact in which victory goes to the… Expand
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