The survival of Class V restorations in general dental practice: part 3, five-year survival

@article{Stewardson2012TheSO,
  title={The survival of Class V restorations in general dental practice: part 3, five-year survival},
  author={Dominic A Stewardson and Siobhan Creanor and Patrick Thornley and Timothy Bigg and C. Bromage and A. Browne and Daniel Cottam and Dave Dalby and John Gilmour and J. Horton and E. Roberts and L. Westoby and T. Burke},
  journal={BDJ},
  year={2012},
  volume={212},
  pages={E14-E14}
}
Objective To evaluate the survival over five years of Class V restorations placed by UK general practitioners, and to identify factors associated with increased longevity.Design Prospective longitudinal cohort multi-centre study.Setting UK general dental practices.Materials and method Ten general dental practitioners each placed 100 Class V restorations of varying sizes, using a range of materials and recorded selected clinical information at placement and recall visits. After five years the… 
Summary of: The survival of Class V restorations in general dental practice: part 3, five-year survival
TLDR
The time to failure of Class V Restorations placed by this group of dentists was reduced in association with the individual practitioner, smaller cavities, glass ionomer restorations, cavities which had not been prepared with a bur, moisture contamination, increasing patient age, and cavities confined to dentine and non-carious cavities.
Risk Factors for Failure of Direct Restorations in General Dental Practices
TLDR
Several factors on the levels of practice, patient, doctor, and tooth were significant predictors for the failure rate and treatment decision should take into account most relevant factors.
Anterior restoration longevity among nursing facility residents: a 30-year retrospective study.
  • T. Ghazal, H. Cowen, D. Caplan
  • Medicine
    Special care in dentistry : official publication of the American Association of Hospital Dentists, the Academy of Dentistry for the Handicapped, and the American Society for Geriatric Dentistry
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TLDR
Knowing how long restorations last, and what factors affect their longevity, could improve treatment planning, informed consent, and communication with residents and caregivers, and also help inform practice guidelines for restorative care among the institutionalized elderly.
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TLDR
The reinforced glass-ionomer restorations which had been placed in a general dental practice more than five years previously were found to be performing satisfactorily at periods of over five years.
Summary of: A retrospective, practice-based,clinical evaluation of Fuji IX restorations aged over five years placed in load-bearing cavities
TLDR
The reinforced glass-ionomer restorations which had been placed in a general dental practice more than five years previously were found to be performing satisfactorily at periods of over five years.
Seven-year clinical performance of resin composite versus resin-modified glass ionomer restorations in noncarious cervical lesions.
TLDR
After seven years of service, the clinical performance of RMGI restorations was superior to that of the adhesive system/resin composite restorATIONS in this study.
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The semi-direct technique exhibited clinical performance similar to direct technique for NCCL, demonstrating an alternative for restorations of these lesions within the studied periods.
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