The surgical treatment of Chiari I malformation

@article{Klekamp2005TheST,
  title={The surgical treatment of Chiari I malformation},
  author={J{\"o}rg Klekamp and Ulrich Batzdorf and Madjid Samii and Hans W Bothe},
  journal={Acta Neurochirurgica},
  year={2005},
  volume={138},
  pages={788-801}
}
SummaryA retrospective study was undertaken on 133 patients with a Chiari I malformation treated within the last 16 years at the Departments of Neurosurgery at the Nordstadt Hospital Hannover, Germany, and the University of California, Los Angeles, U.S.A. Ninety-seven patients presented with symptoms related to accompanying syringomyelia and 4 with associated syringobulbia. They underwent 149 surgical procedures and were followed for a mean of 39±52 months. A decompression at the foramen magnum… 

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Surgical Treatment in Symptomatic Chiari Malformation Type I: A Series of 25 Adult Patients Treated with Cerebellar Tonsil Shrinkage.
TLDR
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Relevance of surgical strategies for the management of pediatric Chiari type I malformation
TLDR
Duraplasty and tonsillar reduction were equally effective but significantly better than bone decompression alone in Chiari type I malformation, and among patients with syringomyelia, tonsillsar reduction was associated with a significantly better outcome.
The fate of syringomyelia after surgical treatment of syringomyelia–Chiari I complex
TLDR
The extra-arachnoidal technique has proved to be a safe, and effective means of treating patients with syringomyelia–Chiari I complex allowing the syrinx to decrease in size or collapse in the majority of cases with an associated improvement in many of the neurological disturbances.
Surgical results of posterior fossa decompression for patients with Chiari I malformation
TLDR
Overall, this work favors a tailored posterior fossa craniectomy with dural scoring as the initial surgical procedure in children with Chiari I malformation with or without a syrinx.
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