The success of assisted colonization and assisted gene flow depends on phenology.

@article{Wadgymar2015TheSO,
  title={The success of assisted colonization and assisted gene flow depends on phenology.},
  author={Susana M. Wadgymar and Matthew N. Cumming and Arthur E Weis},
  journal={Global change biology},
  year={2015},
  volume={21 10},
  pages={
          3786-99
        }
}
Global warming will jeopardize the persistence and genetic diversity of many species. Assisted colonization, or the movement of species beyond their current range boundary, is a conservation strategy proposed for species with limited dispersal abilities or adaptive potential. However, species that rely on photoperiodic and thermal cues for development may experience conflicting signals if transported across latitudes. Relocating multiple, distinct populations may remedy this quandary by… Expand
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