The success of alternative reproductive tactics in monogyne populations of the ant Solenopsis invicta: significance for transitions in social organization

@article{Deheer1998TheSO,
  title={The success of alternative reproductive tactics in monogyne populations of the ant Solenopsis invicta: significance for transitions in social organization},
  author={Christopher J. Deheer and Walter R. Tscbinkel},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={1998},
  volume={9},
  pages={130-135}
}
Newly produced queens from monogyne (single-queen) colonies of the ant Solenopsis invicta usually initiate reproduction independently, that is, without worker assistance. However, some recently mated queens attempt to bypass this risky phase of new colony foundation by entering established nests to reproduce, although it is unclear how often these queens are successful in natural populations. We surveyed a mature monogyne population of 5. invicta in both 1995 and 1996 for colonies headed by… Expand

Tables from this paper

Daughters inherit colonies from mothers in the 'living-fossil' ant Nothomyrmecia macrops
TLDR
It is reported that the Australian 'living-fossil' ant, Nothomyrmecia macrops, is exceptional in that its single queen can be replaced by one of the colony's daughters, which maximizes fitness under kin selection. Expand
Alternative reproductive tactics in the queen-size-dimorphic ant Leptothorax rugatulus (Emery) and their consequences for genetic population structure
TLDR
Queen size dimorphism in the North American ant Leptothorax rugatulus is investigated, finding no evidence that the gene pools of large and small queens are distinct, and queens in polygynous colonies are related to each other. Expand
Alternative reproductive tactics in females: the case of size polymorphism in winged ant queens
TLDR
Across taxa evidence exists that small queens found dependently while their larger conspecifics found colonies on their own, however, in most cases it is not clear whether the small queens exploit unrelated colonies (intraspecific “social parasitism”) or return to their natal colonies. Expand
Queen Dispersal Strategies in the Multiple‐Queen Form of the Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta
TLDR
The results presented here are consistent with the hypothesis that the reproductive syndrome that characterizes polygyny in S. invicta is largely controlled by a single locus. Expand
Unusual Behavior of Polygyne Fire Ant Queens on Nuptial Flights
TLDR
Previously undescribed behavior of fire ant queens on their nuptial flights is reported, and it is suggested that the flying queens are sampling the local environment in order to select a suitable landing site that would contain established polygyne nests into which the queens may be adopted as new reproductives. Expand
Reproductive development and ontogeny of queen pheromone production in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta
TLDR
The ontogeny of three distinct queen pheromones is tightly linked with ovary development and initiation of egg laying in S. invicta, demonstrating reproductive and communicative functions are closely associated during the transition from potential to functional queen. Expand
Strategies of the invasive tropical fire ant (Solenopsis geminata) to minimize inbreeding costs
TLDR
Investigating how inbreeding affects colony founding and potential strategies to overcome its effects in the invasive tropical fire ant, Solenopsis geminata revealed that pleometrosis and cannibalism of diploid male larvae represent strategies through which invasive ants can successfully establish despite high inbreeding. Expand
Range expansion drives the evolution of alternate reproductive strategies in invasive fire ants
TLDR
Investment in parasitic queens extends the ecological lifespan of colonies, thereby increasing a population’s overall habitat occupancy as well as average colony size and territory size, and slowed the rate of range expansion by diverting investment from claustral queens. Expand
A comparison of the colony-founding potential of queens from single- and multiple-queen colonies of the fire antSolenopsis invicta
TLDR
Results are concordant with the growing body of work that implicates a simply inherited genetic polymorphism for the control of a complex social trait in this ant, and they indicate that the modes of reproduction in polygyne fire ants may show considerable diversity. Expand
Social organisation and the evolution of life-history traits in two queen morphs of the ant Temnothorax rugatulus.
TLDR
Novel insights are provided into how life-history traits and their associations were modified during social evolution and adapted to queen reproductive strategies and shifts in molecular physiology and resource availability allow microgyne queens to compensate their small size with a more active metabolism without paying increased mortality costs. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Queen acceptance and nestmate recognition in monogyne and polygyne colonies of the ant Formica truncorum
TLDR
Acceptance of nestmate and non-nestmate young queens in monogyne (single queen) and polygyne colonies of the antFormica truncorumwas compared is compared to shed light on how queen numbers are regulated as well as on causes of variation in queen number. Expand
The Breeding System of the Fire Ant Solenopsis invicta: Effects on Colony Genetic Structure
  • K. Ross
  • Medicine, Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1993
TLDR
Significant differences within nests in the matrilineal composition of worker and queen brood are revealed, constituting further evidence for inequities among nest-mate queens in the allocation of their progeny to the two castes at a single point in time. Expand
QUEEN NUMBER IN COLONIES OF SOCIAL HYMENOPTERA AS A KIN‐SELECTED ADAPTATION
  • P. Nonacs
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1988
TLDR
It is proposed that queen number is an ecologically flexible trait that is influenced by a broad set of factors but is not necessarily linked to specific habitat types. Expand
The Ecology of Communal Breeding: The Case of Multiple-Queen Leptothoracine Ants
TLDR
A framework for understanding multiplequeening in leptothoracines almost certainly results from high costs to single queens of dispersal and colony foundation (high ecological constraints), which select for queens to seek adoption in their natal colony. Expand
Multilocus evolution in fire ants: effects of selection, gene flow and recombination.
  • K. Ross
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Genetics
  • 1997
TLDR
Evidence is presented that selection acting independently on Pgm-3 and Gp-9, in conjunction with gene flow from the alternate, "monogyne" social form of this species, may explain the origin of disequilibrium between the two loci in polygyne fire ants. Expand
Sociogenetic organization of the ants Myrmica ruginodis and Myrmica lobicornis: Number, relatedness and longevity of reproducing individuals
TLDR
The distribution of queen number in M. ruginodis indicates that the study population contains both microgyna and macrogyna types of the species, and the large proportion of colonies where the resident queen is not the mother of the workers shows that the average life span of a queen is short and colonies are serially polygynous. Expand
ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL ORGANIZATION: Insights from Fire Ants and Other Highly Eusocial Insects
TLDR
Evolution of social organization can be important in generating intrinsic selective regimes that channel subsequent social evolution and in initiating the development of significant population genetic structure, including barriers to gene flow important in cladogenesis. Expand
GENETIC ORIGIN OF MALE DIPLOIDY IN THE FIRE ANT, SOLENOPSIS INVICTA (HYMENOPTERA: FORMICIDAE), AND ITS EVOLUTIONARY SIGNIFICANCE
  • K. Ross, D. Fletcher
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1985
TLDR
Three hypotheses are proposed, based on current knowledge of sex‐determining mechanisms in the Hymenoptera, to explain the loss of genetic diversity associated with high rates of diploid male production in S. invicta: allelic diversity was reduced during colonization of North America by a small founder group, genetic structuring of polygyne populations due to local inbreeding caused reduced allelic Diversity and/or increased homozygosity. Expand
Effect of a founder event on variation in the genetic sex-determining system of the fire ant Solenopsis invicta.
TLDR
It is concluded that diploid males have increased in frequency in introduced populations because of a loss of allelic diversity at the sex-determining locus (loci) of S. invicta, which has generated a substantial increase in the estimated segregational genetic load associated with production of sterile diploids males in introducing populations over the load in native populations. Expand
Queen number and sociality in insects
TLDR
A comparison of termites and ants shows the effects of polygny and colony life history on optimal sex investment, as well as the maintenance of high genetic relatedness in multi-queen colonies of social wasps. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...