The structure of scientific collaboration networks.

@article{Newman2001TheSO,
  title={The structure of scientific collaboration networks.},
  author={Mark E. J. Newman},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2001},
  volume={98 2},
  pages={
          404-9
        }
}
  • M. Newman
  • Published 12 July 2000
  • Physics
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The structure of scientific collaboration networks is investigated. Two scientists are considered connected if they have authored a paper together and explicit networks of such connections are constructed by using data drawn from a number of databases, including MEDLINE (biomedical research), the Los Alamos e-Print Archive (physics), and NCSTRL (computer science). I show that these collaboration networks form "small worlds," in which randomly chosen pairs of scientists are typically separated… 

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