The striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) from the succulent karoo, South Africa: a territorial group-living solitary forager with communal breeding and helpers at the nest.

@article{Schradin2004TheSM,
  title={The striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) from the succulent karoo, South Africa: a territorial group-living solitary forager with communal breeding and helpers at the nest.},
  author={C. Schradin and N. Pillay},
  journal={Journal of comparative psychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={118 1},
  pages={
          37-47
        }
}
The authors studied the striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio) in the semiarid succulent karoo of South Africa. Mice forage alone, but they live in groups that share a common nest. Groups consist of 1 to 4 breeding females, 1 to 2 breeding males, and their offspring of both sexes, which remain in their natal group even after reaching adulthood, participating in territorial defense and nest building without showing signs of reproductive activity. Interactions are typically amicable and take place… Expand

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The demography of the striped mouse in the arid succulent karoo of South Africa is described, and the comparatively high population density may result in habitat saturation and thus forced philopatry, promoting group living in the succulence karoo, which contrasts with the solitary life-style exhibited by populations in moist grasslands. Expand
Paternal care in the social and diurnal striped mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio): laboratory and field evidence.
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The authors show that paternal care can be easily studied in the four-striped mouse because it has a short generation period and can be kept in large numbers, and the striped mouse is diurnal, not only making observations in captivity easier but also enabling direct observations in the field. Expand
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Territorial defense in a group-living solitary forager: who, where, against whom?
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